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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  December 3, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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the search for answers in southern california. >> why would he do that. why would he do something like this police say a man and a woman opened fire at a countedy office in san bernadino. >> people shot in the office waiting for cops this morning, trying to piece together a possible motive. >> we do not know if this is a terrorist incident and the outrage of the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since sandy hook.
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winter olympelcome to "your this morning. >> this morning, authorities trying to put together the pieces of a massed shooting, trying to learn why an armed couple opened gir at a lunch at a -- fire at a lunch at a social services center. >> 14 killed, 17 injured. the suspects identified as 28-year-old syed farook, and 27-year-old tashfeen malik. she is believed to be syed farook's wife at this hour police are searching for a motive. the police chief saying that he believed the attack was premeditated. >> based upon what we have seen and how they were equipped. there had to be a degree of planning that went into this. i don't think they ran home, put on the tactical clothes, grabbed guns and came back. >> melissa chan is live in san bernadino. good morning, as police searched for a motive, there are reports that the suspect left the
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holiday gathering angry. you heard also the place says it was not a spur of the moment act. >> that is what is confusing about the situation that we are looking at. police referencing that they believed it had been planned. they had shown up in tactical gear, there were weapons, there'd been explosives. it was confirmed in the last press conference that they had explosive devices at the attack place, and people were saying that this was a holiday party, and syed farook left the holiday party angry, and in some ways it was reactive. a lot of things going on. information developing. police with a lot of work to do. it has been a dramatic and bys i 24 hours. >> when the attacks began, some inside the regional centers thought it was a drill. outside others, including juan
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hernandez heard gun fire. >> it was like a shooting range, being shot, like crazy. >> the shooting lasted a few minutes. the chaos lasted hours. ambulances and law enforcement raced to the location. inside people sheltered in offices, and sent text messages to friends and family. the guys came in next to hear office and started shooting. they locked themselves in her office. they saw bodies on the floor and the ambulance is taking people out in stretchers. >> our daughter is in there and she texted us saying there was a shooter, and she shot 10-20 people. >> police evacuated and escarted people out. one described the fear. >> people were running everywhere, and he said it was
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just almost like a massacre. >> with the attackers on the loose, officials asked the residence to stay home and lock the doors. >> by mid afternoon on wednesday, officer tracked down two suspects and killed a man and a woman in a shoot-out. >> he was identified as syed farook and almost immediately the council on islamic-american relations in los angeles held a press conference condemning the attack, bringing out a dazed relative of the shooter. >> i'm really here on behalf of the family, to support the victims. it's unbelievable what happened. i'm sad and shocked that something like this happened here in my community. something like this happened here. on behalf of my family, we are chocked for what happened. >> late wednesday night the
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sheriff's department gave a last update for the day. >> i have information on what they were armed with. both suspects were armed with a 223 caliber assault rifle. one was a d p.m.s. model 815. the sort a smith and wesson mmp model and both suspects had semiautomatic hand guns. >> the security ha a target, a holiday party, a festive gathering turning deadly. adding more to the last police press are. something that the sheriff's department said is they confirmed that it is two suspects. all day wednesday afternoon there were reports of 2-3 suspect, and they said that they were comfortable, that is the word they used. two suspects dead, no mann hunt for a third or more experience. that's a big relief for san bernadino. >> i am sure it is.
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police are yet to identify the victims, do we know if any worked with the suspect syed farook? >> right now we don't know. we know it was a holiday party, and there were work colleagues of syed farook's there. as i mentioned earlier - as you mentioned early - he left in anger. he was an employees that went around to restaurants making sure they complied with sanitation standards. these are the co-worker that he had. that is all the information that we had. up until a few hours ago they were focused on dealing with the explosive devices at the site of the attack. they confirmed there were explosives, and they are going into the deep dive of understanding the motivation. >> melissa chan for us in san bernadino. >> those event in san bernadino happening quickly as the nation seemed to have been watching.
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al jazeera's jonathan betz walking us through the time line. >> reporter: shortly after 11 am west coast time dispatchers receive the calls for help. early reports up to three shooters were opening fire at a center that served people with disabilities. within minutes dozens arrived. the suspects left. at 11:27 bomb techs are on site and cleared the building. people are escorted out. relatives are looking for loved ones. at 11:15 president obama was briefed. moments before he sits for an interview with cbs news. by noon a search is under way. the police put the area under lockdown, saying the situation is active. all eyes search for a dark s.u.v. with three suspects considered dangerous. 2:00 p.m. authorities confirm the grim
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death toll. higher than first expected. >> we have preliminary numbers, upwards of 14 people that are dead and upwards of 17 wounded a shot out erupts with officers. >> jonathan betz president obama responded as he has main many times. al jazeera lisa stark has that part of the story. >> they monitored the site. >> they will not let it become formal, if the feeling repeated. we don't know what the motives are of the shooters are.
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what we know is there's steps we can take to make americans safer and we can come together at an every level of government, to make these rare as opposed to normal. we shouldn't think it's something that should happen. it doesn't happen in other countries. >> the lighting of the christmas tree, before he took part in the ceremony, paul ryan took a moment to acknowledge what was going on in california. >> i just want to say that we are all thinking about the counter and ongoing tragedy in california today. and i would like to have a brief moment of silence now for those who are affected.
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please keep the victims and their families in your prayers now. >> much more strident language from some democrats, especially those that fought to parse what they say are -- pass what they say are commonsense gun laws, including chris murphy, apt the place where the tragic sandy hook shooting took place. chris murphy tweeted: murphy indicated he'll try again to get lawmakers to look at laws that would close loopholes and increase behind checks, but there is little appetite on capital hill for legislation like this. >> president obama delivered remarks 15 times.
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the most recent before this one was october shooting at the community college in oregon. >> and mass shootings are too common in the u.s. especially when compared to other nations. >> john henry smith is here with more on that. what do the numbers show? >> well, the numbers are disturbing to say the least. these type of shootings happen more often than realized. america sees a mass shooting more than once a day. over 12,000 people have been killed by guns so far this year in america, according to the west coast there has been 355 mass shootings in the u.s. so far this year. these shootings result - these are shootings resulting in four people being shot and killed. a lot of crimes don't make the headlines. since friday's planned parenthood incident, the country saw three mass shootings. one happened in illinois. there was another wednesday morning in savannah georgia,
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where reports say one woman killed and three others shot. the san bernadino incident is now america's deadliest mass shootings since the 2012 sandy hook shooting in connecticut. 27 died. most children. >> with 14 dead, the san bernadino shootings qualify as the third deadliest shooting of the past 20 years, eclipsed by sandy hook, and the virginia tech master. >> americans have become americans to the mass shootings attacks, said the president. if that is true, the sheer number might explain why. >> john henry smith thank you. >> the executive director of new yorkers against gun violence. leah lost her brother to gun violence. thank you for being with us today. you're a new yorker, you may have seen the cover of the new york daily news, and i want to show it to viewers around the
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country. it said "god is not fixing this." you know how difficult it is to pass gun control measures on a national level. is there low-hanging fruit to get consensus. >> we thought there was some. yesterday the house voted - the day before yesterday - not to take up the terror gap pill. nancy pelosi was bringing the vote to a floor. and coast the loophole allowing people on the terrorist of watch list to buy farms. >> which is what the president was talking about. i'm fascinated that the debate in washington takes place 20 nile away from the headquarters of the n.r.a. i lived in washington for 20 years, why don't they take protests there. why don't they take to the n.r.a. saying why are you pushing hard to make sure some things get some and some don't.
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>> we do, in terms of protesting outside their headquarters. yes, maybe we should do that. the n.r.a. is app entry organization. funded by the gun manufacturers, and funded because they know the market for guns is declining, even though gun sales seem to be increasing all the time. what is hatching is the number of american households owning firearms is falling. it's about 2%, whereabouts in the 1970s, it was half. >> you are seeing the phenomenon of fewer people owning more guns, and it's too easy for people to get their hands on guns. the wrong people. snoop when we talk about this case, these guns were obtained legally. arguably there's no gun control legislation, state, locally, that could have prevented this, 14 people from dying.
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>> new york tightened its gun laws, and a number of states did. we have now a stronger all the weapons fan than we did before. we limit high capacity magazines, we have licensing and registration for handguns. we have renewable permits. a gun permit is renewable in the state. as a result in new york, we have done a lot to limit gun accessibility to people that shouldn't have them. >> california had strict gun laws. d.c. was the murder capital. world. >> we understand about that, and people in chicago - guns are like pollution or cockroaches. you can exterminate yourlile area, but borders are porous, state lines are porous, it's easy to traffic guns from states where it's easy to get them into
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states like new york and california. >> the other argument made is that gun control laws may not keep guns from getting to bad people. there's so many guns that the loopholes, if they are closed, you could have a black market for guns. >> you'll never eliminate gun violence, we shouldn't do what we can. studies showed john hopkins looked at connecticut. they got rid of the background system in 2007, and over the next few years they saw a 25% increase in gun homicides. in connecticut. they instituted a permit to purchase the system in 2000 or 1995. and over the 10 year period. they saw a decline in gun hochl sides in connecticut. these laws do work to keep guns out of the wrong hands. >> and yet we are having this debate. >> we are still having the debate. change is coming at the state
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level. states like new york, big states, big population. any special movement is hoping to support the state level and moves to the federal level. they are the last to get it. >> we'll have to leave it there. thank you for coming in. >> still ahead - more on the coverage of the shootings. >> also ahead - murder conviction, a judge overburns a sentence for olympian oscar pistorius. into and trouble for the agency charged with protecting among others, the president.
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the latest on the breaking news, the shooting in san
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bernadino. the death toll stands at 14, with 17 injured. some critically. >> here is what we know. overnight police identified two suspects. 28-year-old syed farook, and 27-year-old tashfeen malik. both dying in the shoot out with police. police say they were armed with two assault rifles and two semiautomatic guns. we don't know the identities of any other victims, and police are searching for a motive this morning. we'll have more, buts there's other news. jurors to hear testimony in the case of the baltimore police officers accused in the death of freddie gray. wednesday, opening statements. john terrett is live outside the police department. testimony getting under way yesterday. who did the jury hear from, and what was the purpose of the testimony? >> good morning from baltimore. the purpose of the opening statement by the prosecution
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yesterday, and the first witness that they called who was a police officer who taught officer william porter medical aid at the academy was to paint a picture of officer porter of a man who failed in his duty of care towards freddie gray, and, indeed, in an electric opening few minutes pt prosecutor said he thought freddie gray's life could have been saved if officer porter act differently. >> reporter: the prosecution zeroed in on two encounters officer william porter had with freddie gray. first when he watched when freddie gray was loaded into the van, placed on his stomach. second when he was called upon to check the prisonier, and the prosecutor said freddie gray was showing signs of difficulties in breathing and showed signs of a
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broken neck at that stage. officer porter sat freddie gray on the bench, did not call a medic, and did not use a seatbelt, closing the doors leaving freddie gray shack ed and handcuffed. >> the prosecution was looking to reveal to the jury that officer porter did not do all that he was under a legal duty to do. namely he did not protect freddie gray from the moment he was custody. the defense painted a different picture of what happened on april 12th. attorney joseph myrtle said officer porter became a police officer because he wanted to help people. >> the defense maintained freddie gray was not injured. and officer porter had a case of gaol itis. they say 132 pounds, gray was violently rocking the van from
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side to side and the defense quoted a witness who shared port of the ride with gray saying he was trying to knock himself out. banking his head against the politician. porter is accused of manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and his case rests on what he did and did not do on april 12th. >> i found the prosecution made an opening statement and you could feel the situation that freddie gray was experiencing in the back of the van. >> the defense put forward different theories for how they hoped to establish a reasonable doubt of officer porter's guilt we are going to hear from officer porter. he will testify, but that is later in the trial. the prosecution will today lay out its case with more witnesses and because the judge told us, the case will be done no later
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than december 17th as you pointed out, we heard the opening arguments yesterday. during the opening arguments, did we get a glimpse into what the defense strategy will be. what did they say in. >> the defense strategy is multiprong. the key thing is they intend to show there is a big difference between what the prosecution says happened, the day freddie gray was arrested, and the way they see it. that is they do not think they look in any way to be mortally injured. they test the prosecution's association that freddie gray arrived officer porter for help because he had difficulty
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breathing. we'll hear from officer port erp, and that is an unusual move. normally defense teams do not make that decision until they see how the case is going. right off the top they said you'll hair from him. >> thank you john terrett. live in balt ror chicago mayor rahm emanuel says he has no intention of leaving his job over the shooting of a black teenager by a white police officer. >> we have a process. i'll be accountable for the actions and decisions i make. >> he fired police superintendent clarke macarthur on tuesday. -- gary mccarthy on tuesday. his don't mass accused of covering up the shooting. officer van dyk was charged with first degree murder. >> investigator are trying to figure out what caused a
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helicopter to crash in tennessee, kilting two. the wreckage was on fire when the responders arrived it's a mystery. officials in alaska say they know what caused the death of the mayor of juno. greg fisk died of natural causes, found dead in his home, weeks after being elected to the job after the break more on the top story, the shootings in southern california that left 14 dead and lunching air strikes on i.s.i.l. targets inside syria f.i.f.a.'s corruption case widens - two more arrested in early morning raids.
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>> they believed in what they
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were doing but they were not scientists. it wasn't science at all. >> there's a lot of lives at stake, a lot of innocent people. >> how many are still locked up? >> the integrity of the criminal justice system is at stake, plain and simple. >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today they will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series. >> we have to get out of here. >> she texted me. she said there was a shooter inside. she said i love you and i came over here. >> welcome back to your world this morning. now 7:29 easter time. the breaking news from son better than california is our top story. 14 dead, 17 wounded.
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>> the shooting is the worst in the u.s. since the sand who can school shooting. this is the front page, reading god isn't fixing this. around that bold headline, images of republicans and their tweets following the killings. >> live from san bernardino, california, is there any idea an what may have motivated this mass shooting? law enforcement is not providing a reason, they are not sure of the motivation. some of the things that were discussed in that last press conference by the sheriff's department late wednesday night included the fact they believe there was some level of preparation involved for this attack, saying that the two shooters appeared at the attack site intactical gear with all these semiautomatic weapons, that this is something you don't quite exactly go home and just grab this stuff and it's ready to go. there was some planning involved, yet at the same time,
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we have a version of events in which there had been some argument that had taken place with farook and somebody else. he had left angry and returned with a second shooter. it's going to be very difficult for law enforcement to try to figure out what happens. an investigation is just starting right now. they've been very busy dealing with explosives at the site of the attack. they are now ready to move on to a second phase in which they will look into the motivations. >> so far, police not identifying the victims. is there any idea just who they are? we do not know who the victims are right now. farook was a county employee. essentially went around to restaurants investigating and making sure they were up to standards in terms of health and sanitation and presumably those were his coworkers and possibly people from other democrats within the county. we just don't know right now,
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del. >> we've got 20 seconds left. it has been a tense time for the people in san bernardino who were told to stay indoors, shelter inside when the shooters were on the loose. describe what the last 24 hours have been like. >> it's been very dramatic, chaotic. i think there's been a sense of relief once law enforcement announced they are not looking for a third suspect. there had been reports of a third suspect and there is no manhunt now. there is a sense of relief but not entirely back to normal. >> melissa, thank you very much. >> there was chaos and fear inside the center when the shooting began. >> we have more on that. good morning. >> good morning. from text messages to phone calls, family members were desperately getting in touch with loved ones moments after the shooting, trying to make sure they were ok. >> try to relax, everyone, try to relax. tile take a bullet before you do. just be cool, ok.
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>> officers led people to safety after a mass shooting that left 14 people dead. one by one in single file, their hands in the air, anxious to escape unharmed. >> go, go, go! >> outside was chaotic with emergency crews at the scene and the family members of those inside making sure their loved ones were safe. >> we've been texting back and forth. >> what does your first text say? >> that there was go going on, live shooters were in the believe and police were outside, they could see them out there. >> witnesses describe what they heard outside. >> kind of sounded like a shooting range. >> all of a sudden, boom, it was like here. >> boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom. >> they were on the loose. >> i was right behind the building and i heard all the shots. >> as the wounded were rushed to the hospital, some of them called loved ones to they're ok. >> she was shot and she was scared and she said i just wanted to tell you that i love you. >> she called us from in the hospital, since we were locked out of it.
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but she's doing better. she's ok. she's alive. >> mark spoke to his daughter after the shooting. she was safe, but the sense was shock was still fresh. >> thank god there weren't more casualties. >> this is crazy. there's just too many shootings, too much bad stuff going on here. you hear about it, but this is insane. >> just two miles away is where the shootout between police and the suspects took place. residents there were told to lock themselves inside their homes. one little boy saying he hit in the bathtub of his house as the shootout took place outside. >> that just makes you shake your head. in necessary, thank you. >> overnight, the brother-in-law of one of the suspects says he has no idea why this happened. he spoke to reporters alongside members of the council of american islamic relations. >> i'm really here on behalf of my family for the victims. it's unbelievable what happened. i am very sad, like deeply sad
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and shocked that something like this happened here in my community. i love this country. i'm living in this community for a long time and something like this happened here, and on behalf of my family, we all are shocked and very sorry for what happened. we all are just completely shocked. we have no idea something like this could happen, you know, and that's exactly why i'm here, you know, to tell all of you on behalf of my family how sad we are. how sad we are that people lost, somebody lost husband and wife, or probably kids, i don't know, you know, i don't have words to express how sad and how devastated i am. i mean, that's all i wanted to say, really. >> we're joined once again by lou columbo, he runs a private security firm this morning's washington post. 355 shootings in a year that is
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only 342 days old. this time, it is the situation in california. last week, it was the situation in colorado. what are law enforcement authorities missing when it comes to trying to stop these events from happening and can they stop them from happening? >> well, that's a couple of questions you asked me there, but the first question i want to address is the one in which we are asking what we can do to stop these. there's not much we can do, to be very candid with you unless you plan on having law enforcement agents in every institution in this country, schools, shopping malls, theaters, pick any location. in reference to the volume of shootings, it's quite parent and i want to say to you, i support the second amendment, but there needs to be an overhaul in what the expectation is of the american public and i think at this point, we need to have some form of compromise and to be very candid with you, i listen to people talk about loopholes and gun shows and the
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acquisition of assault rifles. this issue with gun control needs a much broader approach. the thing that you're going to find interesting is as a law enforcement agent, before they give us a firearm, we go through psychological screening, not limited to mmpi, rorschach, interviews with psychologist and psychiatrists. then we go through a criminal history check, then firearms training. >> and yet police officers are in some cases not being in control of what they do with their weapon. >> there's a tangentual issue with that we can speak to. >> i want to focus you on, you're a professional investigator. they are now looking at motive. what strikes you about this case that really sticks out as a red flag, is that there is a couple. what is it about it that is raising alarms right now. >> more than one shooter for one, the intended victims.
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this again is conjecture at this point, our f.b.i. and intelligence community and law enforcement community in general will confirm this position, but i think this was hate driven. this is something who has disdain for our way of life. >> this young man traveled to saudi arabia. is that a clue? >> that could be. only the f.b.i. and the intelligence community after they vet this can really highlight the significance of that travel. >> when you build up the profile again, i keep going back to this brotherly. he genuinely seemed shocked. he said i have no idea how this could happen. even if -- not even close family members can sort of detect anger or hate if that's what you're calling it, then what do we do? >> i have to be honest with you. i find it very, very difficult for someone in the family to step forward and say that they were unaware totally of the sentiment of this young man and this young woman. >> how do you separate sentiment
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where somebody may be sitting around a thanksgiving table saying i don't like the way i'm being dark terrorized by this candidate on the democratic side or this candidate on the republican side to go into a workplace and open fire? >> the this is not something done spontaneously. it's almost impossible for people in the family not to know what's going on here in some level. that is what the investigation is going to bear. that will be the fruit. >> doesn't everybody criminal have a family member? >> yes, but the issue here is which are disenfranchised from their families. in other words, it didn't appear as if this young man was disenfranchised from the family. if you are not disenfranchised on the family, clearly we cannot
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put the burden on them. >> more on the shootings in a moment, but we do have some other news. british bombers have made their first strikes on isil in syria. four tornado bombers, fighting jets taking off from cypress this morning hit oil fields in eastern syria used by isil to fund attacks on the west. the strikes happened just hours after british lawmakers voted to support prime minister david cameron's plan for the airstrikes. al jazeera's barbara sarah is in london this morning. thanks for being with us. what more can you tell us about these airstrikes against isil? >> i guess the timing is incredible. you said just a few hours. we're hearing that the two, the first two tornado fighter jets took off from cypress literally an hour after the vote went through here in the houses of parliament.
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we are getting a little more detail from the ministry of defense. they have confirmed that they hit the omar oil field in eastern syria. they said that this is a key strategic target, because they believe that about 10% of the money that isil makes from oil actually comes from this oil field. you can see that already the u.k. living up to its promise that it's going to do specific targeting and trying to really effectively cut the funds for isil. we're also hearing that another eight fighter jets have left the u.k. and are now on their way to that air force base in cypress. that would be another two tornadoes. the fighters jets that were used in the attacks overnight and then six typhoons, as well as 150 extra personnel that will be making their way to the region, so really, here we are, less than 24 hours after that vote, but foreign minister david cameron certainly feeling that he has a strong enough mandate to order these attacks on syria, the attacks well underway.
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>> what kind of public reaction has there been? >> it's interesting. everyone here still lives with the specter of the war in iraq back in 2003. back in 2003, a million people turned out on to the streets of london to protest against the u.k. going into that war. now there have been some protests here but obviously nothing even vaguely on that scale. there were a few hundred people here last night as the vote was taking place. also, remember, that all of this snowballed after the attacks in paris. those attacks felt incredibly keenly here in london. there was a fear among the population and sentiment that something needed to be done. it's been very interesting, just in the past week, so what are we, around three weeks after those attacks in paris, even in the past week, public opinion had started to turn against the idea of these attacks in syria against isil. obviously, there is no debate
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here that isil is a threat to the u.k., that something should be done to eradicate it not just from iraq, but from syria, as well. it's just one of the points that prime minister cameron made in the house of commons and other places, as well when he says that this attack in syria against isil is going to make people safer here in london and the rest of the u.k. that that that is the thing that a lot of people around sure of. >> thanks, barbara. >> oscar pistorius has been found guilty of murder just hours ago, an appeals court overturning his earlier conviction for killing his girlfriend in 2013, prosecutors saying he intended to kill her as he shot her four times while she was locked inside that bathroom, the judge calling it a human tragedy. >> the instance of justice required the person should be convicted of the actual crimes they have committed and not of later offenses. that is particularly so in crimes of violence. it would be wrong to effectively rethink away the fact that an
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accused person is guilty of murder if you are convicted with evidence. >> pistorius is under house arrest. he will have to return to court for a new sentence. >> executives from soccer's governing body fifa are meeting to video on reforms that several high ranking fifa officials are not there because they were arrested. in an early morning railed at a swiss hotel. we have the details. >> american and swiss officials said there would be new arrests. their work still isn't done despite arrests that happened 6:00 a.m. local time in zurich today. now, these arrests, what's slightly surprising is that there are as many as 12 at least, so it's nearly on the scale in terms of the people involved of the sweep that
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happened in may which of course started so many of fifa's problems and currently leads to the situation where blatter is suspended and others suspended, too. two of the names i can give you are quite senior physician who have been arrested are howwits of honduras and an individual from paraguay. this is targeting the americas, the caribbean. this is where a lot of the alleged racketeering, money laundering and fraud is said to have happened. these men are both on the fifa executive committee. if day two of the meeting goes ahead, they are trying to reform, it's going to be a depleted executive committee and extremely beleaguered fifa. >> reports say even more former
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or current fifa officials could be indicted by u.s. authorities today. not all are located in zurich. >> it has now been 500 days since iran detained an american journalists. jason rezaian was arrested and convicted on charges that include espionage. he is held in an iranian prison, being denied access to his lawyer. >> there is a new scandal for the secret service, the house oversight committee finding breaches over the last years, including the prostitution case in colombia and a number of security breaches involving president obama and the white house. the report faults leadership failings and budget cuts. >> this morning, texas is trying to block the arrival of a family of syrian refugees who are supposed to be resettled in dallas. the republican governor sites security concerns in a lawsuit against the obama administration, challenging the base of a federal law allowing
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for refugees to come to this country. texas is one of two dozen states that say it won't accept syrian refugees. president obama said blocking resettlement is illegal. >> more children trying to escape violence and poverty in places like mexico, many winding up in border towns waiting for their chance to get to the united states. paul beban takes a look at the situation. >> i'm on a dusty back street here in ray knows is a. like so many border towns, it struggles with poverty, drug cartel related violence and i also a way station for those from guatemala, honduras, el salvador. this compound right here is a hostel, a shelter where people might spend a night or two before trying to make it across the rio grande, right behind the compound behind these trees, is
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the last push to make it across the border into the united states. >> right now, the number of people trying to make that journey is on the rise especially among people under 18. this october, nearly twice the number of unaccompanied minors were caught. we spoke to one young woman we can only identify by the name of maria. for her security, we can't show her face. mexican immigration officials brought her here to a government run center in reynosa after she was captured at a nearby favor house. she said the violence in her home country of el salvador led her to leave. an aunt in texas sent the money to pay human smugglers after she saw a man kill her younger brother. >> i was never afraid of the man coming for me but my aunt said it is do dang russian for you to be in el salvador. i agreed. i will live with my aunt in
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texas and worry about the paperwork later. >> el salvador moved into first place in the world in the rape and murders of women. guatemala is third in that category and honduras is number one in the murder rate in the world overall. these people are coming as mexico is cracking down on the southern border and tightening things here in reynosa. as much as we hear of women and children making it across the border, there are many, many others who are making it just this far before being turned back. >> al jazeera, reynosa, mexico. >> when we come back, we'll search for answers. >> our continuing coverage of the san bernardino shootings after this break.
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>> 14 people were killed, at least 17 injured and some critically. here is what we know so far. police identified the suspects at 28-year-old sayed farook and 27-year-old tashfeen malik. she is believed to be his wife. >> police still searching for a motive, the police chief saying he believes the attack was premeditated. >> we think based upon what we have seen and based upon how they were equipped, there had to be some degree of planning that went into this opinion i don't think they ran home, put on these type of tactical clothes and came back with these guns in a spur of the moment thing. >> it may seem there is no end in sight for shootings like these and a pattern seems to be emerging. al jazeera science and technology correspondent explains. >> in april of 2012, a student came to this university here in oakland, california and opened
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fire. he ended up killing seven people with a handgun. why does this keep happening here? why is it that we have so many mass shootings in the united states that we actually have a leader board for these events? >> a a new study seems to answer that question. >> somebody is outside one of the doors shooting through the door. >> it might seem impossible to pin down any commonality, but the united states offers so many shootings to study, patterns begin to emerge. the study by a university of alabama criminologist identifies mass shootings as a global problem but unusually concentrated here in the united states. even though the u.s. accounts for only 5% of the world's population, we somehow account for 31% of the mass shootings that take place. >> the study identifies three major themes. a hunger for attention and glory, the crushing effects of personal disappointment and access to guns. >> the study points out an
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indigenous american condition it calls captionallism, the idea that you can be great and famous here. he talks about the crushing disappointment that can come from that. it points out a study that show 81% of high school students believe they were bo to have a great paying job by the age of 25, have a better life financially than their parents did. 26% of them believe that they were soon going to be famous. how could you not be disappointed in a culture like that? it's the crushing strain of that disappointment, the study points out, that is often common to rampage shooters. >> perhaps in response to that disappointment, the study finds in rampage shooters a twisted hope for some sort of fame through killing, a desire that those shooters seem to share with another category of self destructive murderer, suicide bombers. the final element that the study identifies is of course guns. the study found that among 171 nations that it looked at, there
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is no connection between the rate of actual violence and the rate of mass shootings. countries like mexico, venezuela, nigeria which of terrible murder rates don't really have mass shootings. instead, it's access to firearms, the study found that truly makes the difference. again in that category, the united states is far and away the world leader. we have 88.8 guns per 100 people in this country. compare that to second place yemen, a country in the midst of a terrible civil war. they only have 54.8 guns per 100 people. syria, a country people are actively trying to escape only has 3.9 guns per 100 people. it doesn't make the top 100. the study finds that we may not be able to do anything about our desire for fame or the frustration of comparing our personal ambitions to our personal achievements, but it does say the most concrete step we can take is limiting access to guns. it points out that that may very
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well be the most politically complicated solution of all and that is another thing that sets america apart from the rest of the world when it comes to this problem. >> that is jacob ward reporting. gets back to the issue of low hanging fruit, ideology is difficult to tackle. mental illness is difficult to tackle. what is the commonality in all of these? >> the debate goes on. we'll have much more on the shooting in send better than coming up in our next hour. change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house".
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>> exclusive conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america.
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>> the search for answers in southern california. >> why would he do that? why would he do something like this? >> police say a man and a woman opened fire at a county office in san bernardino. >> shooting at my work, people shot in the office waiting for pop. pray for us. >> this morning, trying to piece together a motive. >> we do not know this this is a terrorist incident. >> the outrage over the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since
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hook. authorities trying to figure out the motive behind the deadly shooting at a social services center in san bernardino, the two suspects in the case identified as 25-year-old sayed farook and 27-year-old tashfeen malik, the shooting rampage leaving 14 dead, 17 injured. >> al jazeera's melissa chan is livlive in san bernardino. police say the suspects left the holiday gathering angry, but they also say the amount of weapons this couple had pointed to a planned attack. >> that's what's so confusing,
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something investigators will have to look into. you have two stories, almost. they don't quite fit. first, that these two shooters returned to the location, the social services believe intactical gear with plenty of weapons, something that police really felt strongly had to have been planned to some extent and yet there was also reports from people that there had been some kind of arguments that had ensued. a lot of work for investigators to do. it has been a very dramatic 20 hours. >> when the attacks began, some people inside the inland regional center say they thought it was a drill. others outside knew they heard gunfire. >> i heard like kind of sounded like a shooting rage, just shots, wing shot like crazy. >> the shooting lasted just a few minutes, but the chaos went on for hours. ambulances and law enforcement officers raced to the location.
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inside, people sheltered in offices and sent text messages to friends and family. >> he said the guy shot came in next to her office and i guess started shooting. they locked themselves in, in her office. they seen bodies on the floor and she said right now ambulance are taking people out in stretchers. our daughter's in there. she texted us about 30 minutes ago and said that there was a shooter. she thought he'd shot 10-20 people. >> police evacuated and escorted people out. one survivor described the fear. >> they just started shooting, and people were running everywhere, and he said it was just -- it was like almost like a massacre. >> with the attackers on the loose, officials asked residents to stay home and lock their doors. by mid afternoon wednesday, officers had tracked down two suspects and in a shootout killed one man and one woman.
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he was identified as sayed farook and almost immediately, the council on american islamic relations in los angeles condemned the attack, even bringing out a dazed relative of the dead shooter. >> i'm really here on behalf of my family for the victims, it's unbelievable what happened. i am very sad, like deeply sad and shocked that something like this happened here in my community. i love this country. i'm living in this community for a long time, and something like this happened here, and on behalf of my family, we all are shocked and very sorry for what happened. >> late wednesday night, the sheriff's department gave one last update for the day. >> i do have information on what they were armed with. both suspects were armed with what was essentially a .223 caliber assault rifle. one was called a dpms model a15,
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the wore smith and wesson mmp15 model. both suspects were armed with semiautomatic hand gangs. >> the shooters had such you a specific target, a holiday party for county employees, a festive gathering that turned horribly deadly. >> we just had a little bit more from that last press conference late wednesday night. they did confirm that they are comfortable that there were just two shooters wednesday afternoon. it was very chaotic with reports of two or three shooters. there is no longer a manhunt, something that the police confirmed, a big relief for the city of san bernardino. >> when do we expect to hear more about who the victims were? >> we do not know. we do know that the next press conference is going to take place from the san bernardino sheriffs county police department at 9:00 a.m. local time, so that is 12:00 noon eastern time, but they did not say whether they were going to release victims' names at that
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press conference. it's the latest we are going to get in terms of press conference, stephanie. >> as word came in about the shootings, president obama responding as he has so many times, calling for more action on gun control. during an interview taped with cbs news, the president saying this continues to disturbing pattern of gun viewence in america that has no parallel. >> there's some steps we could take not to eliminate every one of these mass shootings, but to improve the odds that they don't happen as frequently. common sense gun safety laws, stronger background checks. we have a no-fly list where people can't get on planes but those same people we don't allow to fly could go into a store right now in the united states and buy a firearm and there's nothing that we can do to stop them. we should come together in a bipartisan basis on every level of government to, you know, make
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these rare as opposed to normal. >> this is the 15th time president obama speaking out after a mass shooting in america, the most recent following the october shooting at a community college in oregon. in 10 minutes, we'll talk about the politics of gun control and the on line backlash to what some politicians had to say about the shootings. >> jack tomas demarco is an undersecretary and fellow at the foreign policy institute. he told al jazeera what he expects to see from the federal government. >> they're bog to try with the help of the san bernardino police, with the f.b.i., the california state police, all of the interagency on the scene right now, they're going to be harvesting as much evidence as possible. they need to find out the identities of these individuals. they need to find how they got their guns, where they got their guns, whether there was planning
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involved, obviously there was. was there anyone else who helped them in the perpetration of these acts and what were possibly the motives. were these just criminals, were these individuals who had a it political motive, was it a terrorist politically motivated terrorist action. was it a copy cat action of what happened in paris. right now, we don't know these things and we're not going to know that initially or probably in the next 48 hours, because we're still harvesting that evidence, but what the intelligence community will do, what the law enforcement community will do is they will begin literally connecting the dots and trying to answer all of these questions. that will tell us what we need to do better next time. the biggest problem is these are very, very hard incidents to prevent, especially when you have no prior warning, especially if the perpetrators are individuals below the radar screen. we don't know if these individuals have been but that's going to be the challenge for us to find out. >> mass shootings becoming all
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too common in the u.s., especially when compared to other industrialized nations. >> john henry smith has been looking into the numbers on that. >> the numbers are quite sobering. these types of shootings happen more often than you might realize. on average, americans see a mass shooting more than once a day. 12,000 people have been killed by guns so far this year in america, according to the washington post there have been 355 mass shootings in the u.s. so far this year. the post defines mass shootings in which at least four people get shot or killed in a single incident. a lot of these crimes do not make the headlines. case in point, since friday's planned parenthood in colorado, the country has seen three mass shootings, one happened in illinois. there was another in savannah georgia where one was killed and three others shot. then hours later came these shootings in california. the san bernardino incident is
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now america's deadliest mass shootings since the 2012 sandy hook shootings in connecticut. 27 died that day, most of them children. with mourn dead, the san bernardino shootings qualify as the third deadliest mass shooting of the past 20 years, eclipsed only by sandy hook and the virginia tech massacre of 2007. the president says americans have become numb to these mat shootings. the sheer number of them might explain why, three since last friday. >> the washington post saying 355 in 342 days already. john henry smith, thank you. >> critics say it's too easy to get guns in this country and that it's time for washington to act. >> new york tightened its gun laws after sandy hook and a number of states did in addition to new york, connecticut. we have now a stronger assault weapons ban than we did before.
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we limit high capacity ammunition magazines, have licensing and registration for handguns. we have renewable permits every five years like a driver's license, as a result, new york, we've done a lot to limit gun accessibility to people who shouldn't have them and our gun theft rate reflects that. >> california had district gun laws, d.c. was the murder capital of the world. you couldn't own a gun in washington, d.c. >> what you have to understand, people also mention chicago, guns are like that pollution or com roaches, you can protect your little area, but borders are porous, state lines are porous, it's easy to traffic guns from states where it's easy to get them, southern states and western states into states like new york and california. >> the other argument is that gun control laws may not keep guns from get to go bad people. there are so many guns in this
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country that even the loopholes if closed, you could have a black market for guns. >> you are never going to eliminate gun violence in this country, that's true. that doesn't mean we shouldn't do everything we can. johns hopkins has looked at missouri and connecticut. in missouri, they got rid of their background check system for handguns and over the next few years saw 25 increase in gun homicides control for other factors. in connecticut, they instituted a permit to purchase system in 1995 and they saw a decline, a significant decline in gun homicides in connecticut. these laws actually do work to keep guns out of the wrong hands. the n.r.a. argues. >> and yet we're still having this debate. >> we're still having the debate, but change is coming in the state level. states like new york and california, big states, big populations, that are leading the way. any social movement starts at the municipal or state level,
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and moves to the federal level. they're the last to get it. >> at the federal level, earlier this week, house republicans blocked debate that would have closed a loophole allowing suspected terrorists to legally buy weapons. >> we continue to follow all of the news coming out of san bernardino, the latest on the shooting coming up. >> the on line outrage to the phrase thoughts and prayers. will this shooting change the way the nation thinks about gun laws. we'll speak to a republican stat gist. >> an agency in crisis newly revealed security mistakes involving the secret service.
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>> the latest now on our brecking news, the shoot iing in san bernardino california. >> police identifying 28-year-old sayed farook and 27-year-old tashfeen malik, both dying in the shootout with police armed with two assault rifles and two semiautomatic handguns. we don't nope the identities of the victims yet. police are still searching for a motive. >> there was chaos and fear inside the center as you can imagine when the shooting began. >> we have more on that part of the story. good morning. >> good morning. some people locked themselves inside their offices, sending text messages and calling loved ones. they stayed inside the building until they got the ok to come out. >> try to relax, everyone, try to relax. i'll take the bullet before you do, that's for damn sure, just be cool, ok? >> the moment the officer led people to safety after the mass
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shooting that left 14 people dead, one by one in single file, their hand in the air, anxious to escape unharmed. >> go, go, go! >> outside was chaotic with emergency crews at the scene and the family members of those inside making sure their loved ones were safe. >> we've been texting back and forth. >> what does your first text say? >> that there was something going on, live shooters were in the believe and police were outside, they could see them out there. >> outside, witnesses describe what they heard outside. >> kind of sounded like a shooting range. >> all of a sudden, boom, it was like here. >> boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom boom. >> they were on the loose. >> i was right behind the building and i heard all the shots. >> as the wounded were rushed to the hospital, some of them called loved ones to say they're ok. >> she was shot and she was scared and she said i just wanted to tell you that i love you. >> she called us from in the
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hospital, since we were locked out of it. but she's doing better. she's ok. she's alive. >> mark spoke to his daughter after the shooting. she was safe, but the sense was shock was still fresh. >> thank god there weren't more casualties. >> this is crazy. there's just too many shootings, too much bad stuff going on here. you hear about it, but this is insane. >> just two miles away is where the shootout between police and the suspects took place. residents there were told to lock themselves inside their homes. one little boy saying he hid in the bathtub of his house as the shootout took place outside. june as the father said, this is insane. >> much more on the shooting throughout the morning but there are other stories we want to get you caught up on. oscar pistorius has been found guilty of murder. hours ago an appeals court overturned his earlier conviction for killing girlfriend reeva steenkamp in 2013. prosecutors say pistorius intended to kill her as he shot her four times while she was locked in the bathroom. the judge calls is a human
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tragedy. >> the interest of justice requires the person should be convicted of the actual crimes they have commit and not of lesser offenses. that is particularly so in crimes of violence. it would be wrong to rethink away the effect that an accused person who is guilty of murder if you ought to have been convict of that offense. >> pistorius spent one year in jail. he is currently under house arrest. he will have to return to court now for a new sentence. >> executives from soccer's good morning body fifa are voting on reforms today. it comes as several high ranking fifa officials were arrested this morning at a swiss hotel. that is where the executive committee has been holding meetings. even more former or current fifa officials could be indicted today. they face charges of racketeering, money laundering and fraud. >> jurors will be hearing more testimony later this morning in the trial of a baltimore police officer accused in the death of freddie gray.
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on wednesday, opening statements painted different pictures of what happened in the back of that police van. john terrett live outside the courthouse, john, what stood out to you most in terms of the difference between the prosecution and the defense case? >> good morning. i think the take away from that is that there is a yawning gap, a chasm between what the prosecution said happened on april 12, the day freddie gray was arrested and what the defense says happened. let me deal with the prosecution first. the prosecuting attorney in an electrifying opening few seconds said that he thought freddie gray's life could have been saved if only officer william g. porter had done what he was supposed to do. the prosecution case centers on two encounters that porter had with freddie gray, first of all when he saw him being loaded into the police wagon in the first place, he stood back and watched that and on a second
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occasion when he was called to check on him and the the implication from the prosecution is that freddie gray's neck was already broken at the point that officer porter was called to check on him. now they called an officer from the police academy at their first witness to give testimony. the officer trained officer porter in giving medical aid. the prosecution said that all officer porter would have had to do in order to call a medic was press a red button which police officers in baltimore have on their chest, that's all it would have taken. he did not do that. this is decent to show a police officer who failed in his duty of care toward freddie gray. >> those opening arguments are supposed to be a roadmap. jurors heard opening statements from both sides. what will porter's defense be against these allegations? >> the most interesting thing is defense, in cases of this kind,
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it's usual that the defense decides as they go along, depending how they think their case is going, whether a defendant will testify or not, right off the top, they said you will be hearing from will come porter in his own words and the defense attorney said several times i'm saying this now, butter going to hear this from officer porter later in the trial. they see things very, very differently than the prosecution. they say when officer porter checked on freddie gray, he did not seem to be mortally wounded. they are going to contest the fact that he was having difficulty breathing and say officer porter thought on that day that freddie gray was suffering from what is known as jailitis, faking an illness in order to avoid going to jail. the big news from the defense is that porter himself will testify. >> what do we expect today? >> today, more testimony from prosecution witnesses that will continue for a while before we get to hear from officer porter
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himself, and of course, dell, we know because the judge has told us that the trial will last no longer than the 17th of december. >> john terrett for us live in baltimore, john, thank you very much. >> this morning, texas is trying to block the rival of a family of syrian refugees who are supposed to be resettled in dallas. republican governor greg abbot is citing security concerns in a lawsuit against the bam map administration, challenges the basis of a federal love allowing for refugees to come to this country, texas will not accept syrian refugees. president obama said blocking them is illegal. >> more people under the age of 18 trying to escape violence and poverty in places like mexico. many wind up in border towns waiting to get into the united states. paul beban takes a look at the situation. >> i'm on a dusty back street here in reynosa. like so many border towns, it
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struggles with poverty, drug cartel related violence and i also a way station for those from guatemala, honduras, el salvador. this compound right here is a hostel, a shelter where people might spend a night or two before trying to make it across the rio grande, right behind the compound behind these trees, is the last push to make it across the border into the united states. >> right now, the number of people trying to make that journey is on the rise especially among people under 18. this october, nearly twice the number of unaccompanied minors were caught. we spoke to one young woman we can only identify by the name of maria. for her security, we can't show her face. mexican immigration officials brought her here to a government run center in reynosa after she was captured at a nearby safe house. she said the violence in her home country of el salvador led her to leave.
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an aunt in texas sent the money to pay human smugglers after she saw a man murder her younger brother. >> i was never afraid that the man will come after me, but my aunt said it is too dangerous for you to be in el salvador. i agreed. i will live with my aunt in texas and worry about the paperwork later. >> el salvador moved into first place in the world in the rape and murders of women. guatemala is third in that category and honduras is number one in the murder rate in the world overall. these people are coming as mexico is cracking down on the southern border and tightening things here in reynosa.
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as much as we hear of the numbers of women and children making it across the border, there are many, many others who are making it just this far before being turned back. >> al jazeera, reynosa, mexico. >> investigators this morning are trying to figure out what caused a military helicopter to crash in rural tennessee, killing two army pilots. military officials say crew members were dog a routine training mission when the helicopter went down opinion the wreckage was on fire when first responders arrived. >> we're going to have much more on the shooting in san bernardino, including a motive, police going through the homes of the suspects accused of killing at least 14 people. secretary of state john kerry said isil can be beaten in a matter of months.
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>> this is one of the most important sites in the century. >> this linked the mafia and the church. >> why do you think you didn't get the medal of honor? >> i can't allow you not to go into that because that is your job. >> we gonna bring this city back one note at a time. >> proudest moment in my life. >> welcome back. the breaking news from san bernardino california is our top story this morning. authorities still trying to figure out why an around couple opened fire during a holiday lunch at a social services center. >> 14 people were killed, at least 17 injured, some critically. police identified the suspects
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at sayed farook and tashfeen malik. they were killed in a shootout. police are searching for a motive. they believe the attack was premeditated. >> we wanting to live to san bernardino, california. again, the question, do we know anymore about the suspects or a possible motive? >> law enforcement authorities have actively avoided talking about a motive. they say that these two shooters did appear intactical gear with a lot of weapons and that they do believe that there was some level of planning involved this was a holiday party and some argument had taken place. they have two narratives, one say it was planned, one say sparked, emotional driven behavior. all the more confusing which is
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why when a press conference was held wednesday, a relative of farook's spoke. this is what he had to say. >> we are all shocked and very sorry to happen. that is why we are here, to tell you how sad we are, sad that someone last husband and wife, probably kids, i don't know, you know, i don't have words to express how sad and how devastated i am. >> the other husband and wife are we believe the two shooters. we understand there was a six-month-old baby that they had left behind, so all the more mystifying in terms of the motive. >> the other missing piece of this puzzle among many, the identity of the victims, when might we learn who they are? >> well, we do know from the sheriff's department that they are going to have the first
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press conference of the day at 9:00 a.m. local time. that's on the west coast, which means it will be at noon eastern time, but they did not make clear whether they were going to disclose information about the victim, those who died in the shootings or what else they will discuss. i think it's something that we'll just have to watch throughout the day and see how it plays out for the investigators. del. >> we know since paris, police departments have been on high alert. how was this particular police department coping with mass shootings like they have never ever seen? >> san bernardino is a little out of the ways, a place you wouldn't really expect this to happen, but having said that, they did tell us that police officers arrived on the shooting scene about four minutes after the shots were first fired, so very quickly, fairly relatively quickly and of course we have federal agents that arrived quickly. all in all, it seems that the sheriffs were very proud of law enforcement officers and made a
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point of saying that in that press conference, that it was heroic is what they said. >> thank you very much. >> joining me now from lowell massachusetts is a program manager at the center for terrorism and security studies at the university of massachusetts at lowell. thank you so much for being with us, neil. the san bernardino police chief isn't ruling out terrorism. that's why we have you here. why is it so important for us to know at this point whether it is that? >> well, i think it's important in terms of public reaction, but i think a lot of the previous reports that have come through are absolutely vital here, that untiwe can truly discern the motive of the individual, we are going to be at an absolute loss to know if this is terrorism or a mass shooting. it's always the motive that defines whether this is terrorism or not and it is going to be crucial to determine what that is, which is now exponentially harder now that the two main perpetrators of
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this attack as we know have been killed. >> what are the similarities between mass shooters and terrorists in general? >> it's a question explored more recently now. on the face, they are similar especially with recent tactical changes, a move towards firearms. some similarities maybe in those personal social differences that may lead someone, motivate someone. the political ideologies behind are not dichotomous, they can be blurry. they publish manifestos. chris dahmer, it was called terrorism. we may not view it as that. it is becoming harder and harder to work one from the other, which means maybe we should start to view them at one. >> it does beg the question how
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useful that question actually is. i think everybody sort of wants to understand how to prevent these things from happening. my question to you as a color is how does religious or political ideology affect a person's subconscious as compared to mental illness or psychosis. >> psychosis, mental illness is not unheard of in these types of samples. research coming out from london found that when someone was acting alone, i.e. isolated from a group, they were 18 times mor likely to have a mental illness than those who operate as part of the traditional network or terrorist organization. the issue we need to talk about is that there is always going to be intention, be it personal, be it political, but more importantly, is the capability aspect. >> you're talking about gun
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control? >> i absolutely am, because when you have that capability aspect, it makes it easier to commit these atrocities. i'm not saying controlling guns is going to be the solution. i want to draw you to lee rig by, a soldier here in england murdered by two terrorist individuals with terrorist ideologies. they didn't use a gun, they used a car and meat cleaver because they did not know how to build a bomb and in england we don't have access to guns. there will still be terrorism, it will be in a slightly different, potentially less lethal form. >> farook's brother-in-law seeming genuinely shocked, saying there was no idea this would happen. are there signs of spotting someone who could do a mass shooting? >> absolutely. research is about something called the bystander affect. it comes out of the research. they found that in about 70% of
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terrorist attacks, there was signs of in tent, be it definite intent, i will do something, or awareness of grievances, awareness of ideologies in the community. that is a gigantic potential for intervention. psychologists have known for years and years, decades that mobilizing, galvanizing the bystander is an incredibly tricky thing to do. we see signs everywhere, see something, report something, see something, say something, but few will ever do it, because it is much easier to find another he can planation. he doesn't mean it. maybe he is not being serious. there are signs, leak acknowledge, but it's hard to turn leakage into tips and intelligence and even when those reports come in, there are so many reports, so many threats that it's hard for law enforcement age jen says to sort out the needle from the haystack. >> thank you so much, really appreciate your insights this morning. >> we'll bring you the very
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latest, including the police briefing expected in about three hours which we will carry live. there are other stories making headlines. british bombers making their first airstrikes on isil targets in syria. four tornado bombers taking off from an air base in cypress this morning, officials in the u.k. saying they hit oil fields in eastern syria being used by isil to fund attacks against the west. they came hours after british lawmakers approved making those airstrikes. barbara is live in london. what can you tell us about the airstrikes the british carried out against isil? >> reports are actually saying that it wasn't even hours, it was 57 minutes from when the vote passed here at the houses of parliament to when the first 2r.a.f. tornado fighter jets took off from that air base in
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cypress to fire over syria where they had their airstrikes. in total, we understand that four tornado air fighter jets went to syria. they targeted oil fields, we're hearing the omar oil field to the east of syria. this is very critical, because according to the defense ministry here, they think about 10% have the money that isil makes from selling oil on the market actually indirectly comes from this very oil field. i guess this is the british living up to their promise of having targeted attacks, targeted strikes to try to disable isil any way they can in syria, as well as in iraq. >> barbara, there was this major announcement in belgrade today. secretary of state john kerry saying that isil can be defeated within months. what are they saying in the u.k. and have they heard that? >> the real question here would be the vote of extending
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airstrikes from iraq to syria now as well. it's the idea of a time frame and what it actually means to defeat isil. the foreign secretary was questioned last night and today about the time frame, what is they are definition of success. he said the success hinged on two things, one was trying to cooperate with 70,000 what they termed moderate forces on the ground, and also to follow the time frame of the political accord that's been drafted in vienna. according to this accord and it was put together by a lot of the nations that are involved in syria, there's meant to be elections in syria in 18 months, supervised by the u.n., but of course when actually pressed on what happens if those elections don't happen or there are no ground troops, they didn't have a plan b., everyone realizing it's not just about defeating isil. the point is you have to solve the vacuum in syria that allows
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isil tog and spread the way it did. >> barbara, thank you very much. >> this morning, russian president vladimir putin is laying out the state of his nation. he called out the u.s. though not by name for spurring what he called terrorism. >> we know who wants to create regime change who wants to vital the rules. they have made a complete mess. they have strayed statehood and they have opened the road to extremists and terrorists. >> putin also pointed the finger at turkey as his government fights with ankara over the downg of a russian war plane. he said turkey provides military assistance to isil and he will make turkey regret shooting down the plane. >> more on the breaking news from san bernardino after the break. >> there is a new investigation that shows more trouble for the agency charged with protecting the president. >> donald trump has struck a
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chord with the republican party fateful.
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>> again, the latest now on our breaking news, the shooting in san bernardino, california. the death toll stands at 14 with 17 wounded. >> police identifying 28-year-old sayed farook and
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tashfeen malik, the suspects both dying in the shootout. they were armed with two assault rifles and two semiautomatic handguns. we don't know the identities of victims just yet. police are searching for a motive. >> the 20 presidential candidate started talking about the shootings almost as soon as it happened. donald trump was at a campaign rally in virginia. >> we want to thank the law enforcement and police. they are unbelievable people. with that said, can we have a moment of silence? a lot of people killed, and in honor of those people and the victims generally, let's have a moment of silence, please. ok. thank you. >> several other gop candidates tweeted about the shootings using the worst thoughts and
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prayers, so did mitch mcconnell writing: >> connecticut democratic senator tweeting this: >> hillary clinton on the democratic side also writing: >> jill watkins is a republican strategist and former white house aid to former president george h.w. bush. the democrats are going to say tougher gun laws, republicans will say more guns and in fore the laws on the books. the bottom line is 89 people dying each and every day from gun violence from gun violence president brady center. is this a pox on both houses? >> they've got to figure a way to solve the problem and fitch
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it and they've got to work together to get that done. we've got a serious problem in this country. it's not going to be an easy fix. we've got to figure out how democrats and republicans can actually talk together to reasonably solve the problem. it's not going to be easy. it's not a matter of saying just no guns or stricter laws. we've just got to work harder to connect with each other on both sides of the aisle. there has been verge tech, sandy hook, aurora and the list goes on and on and on. is it too late for any meaningful action? >> it's not too late. the time is right now for more meaningful dialogue. the dialogue has been very innocent-year. people have been at fever pitch in opposition to each other, and i think that the theatrics have to be put aside and reasonable.
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people have to come together and figure out how we make our country safer. >> there have been 355 mat shootings in a year that is only 342 days old. do you see anything that is going to reverse this trend and let me ask the question this way, do you think we are going to be talking exactly about the same topic at this time next year. >> i hope not. in a perfect world, we would be able to say a year from now that it's gotten better, but unfortunately in a political environment like we face now and a partisan environment like we face now, we have challenges ahead of us. i mean, some people may use this sad event for political gain to exploit their opportunity for elected office and if that happens, of course, that's a sad thing, but the hope and the prayer is that we will be able to move forward, that we'll be able to say a year from now that we don't have to worry about these kind of events happening. it's going to take a lot of work.
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the prayer that i have, i'm also a pastor, and the prayer that i have is that people will put aside politics, put aside the theatrics and reasonably come to the table and figure out how we make our country safer and what we need to do to get that done. >> i raised this question earlier, the n.r.a. is less than 20 miles away from d.c. and congress. we saw the shooting in chicago that led to the firing of the police chief there. there has never been a protest outside of the n.r.a. have they become immune to evening having to take part in the debate? >> america is just politically divided. the n.r.a. becomes a symbol of the fight against more gun control. they've got a lot of money, there are a lot of members of congress who have been supported by the n.r.a.
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>> a lot of people want things done including n.r.a. supporters. >> that is exactly so. we can't easily demonize anybody, to make scapegoats out of people, out of groups just causes them to dig in deeper. if we work with folks who have not been in concert in the past and figure out with them how do we make our country safer, what do we need to do, do we change the gun laws, what do we do to make it safer, then we can arrive at a place that is reasonable and that actually has -- allows us to have a safer america. we can't demonize anybody. the political rhetoric has to be put aside. you can't say well, you know, these folks have been our enemies, so therefore they're the bad guys. you've got to figure out a way to reasonably talk to people who have been at adds and people at adds in the past to recently talk together to solve the problem. we have too many people dying from mass shootings and it's got
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to stop. >> joe watkins who joined us by phone who hearkens back to a kinder, gentler washington, thank you very much. >> a seven page letter written by the head of the national republican senator yell committee calls out donald trumps brash style and labels him a misguided missile. trump says what's on his mind and that's a problem. our candidates will have to spend full time defending him or condemning him. we need not be tied to him so closely that we have to be engaged in permanent cleanup. al jazeera went to a trump rally and find out why supporters think he should be the next president. >> i would like to see donald trump as president because he's funny. >> trump supporters say his appeal is that he says the unexpected and doesn't hold back. >> i don't like political correct innings at all. i think everybody gets up there and tries to beat around the bush. they should get to the point and
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tell it how it is and he does. >> thank you very much, so nice. >> trump is tapping into a frustration that many feel, that politicians aren't authentic, don't say what they think and supporters say donald trump is different. one of those fans is marine corps veteran wayne cole. that so-called straight talking can go too far, like when trump said vietnam veteran and former prisoner of war senator john mccain is not a war hero. >> have you gotten over it? have you forgiven him for it? >> no, that's why i'm here tonight. >> he wants to hear more. he loves trump's plan to build a wall at the mexican border and yet is worried about his call to deport all illegal immigrants. >> i talked about illegal immigration and little did i know i was hitting a nerve that was so incredible. >> cole said that gets personal. >> i have a nephew that has a wife from somewhere, and to ship her back out and then wait for a couple years to come back in i think is wrong after she has a
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child here, and is going to school, so she'd have to leave her family. >> you have people that want to blow up our cities, kill all of our people. >> critics say trump's comments may get attention but are harmful. this 16-year-old is here to counter his message. >> a lot of what he says is outrageous to hear and not politically correct. to see the reaction of him and his people. >> some here love that he is not politically correct. >> politically correct doesn't mean that you can't speak out about an issue, it means you have to respect everyone. everyone in this country deserves to be respected, no matter their background or ethnicity or anything. they should be respected. it's their right. he doesn't respect anyone. >> trump has been condemned for calling for a database to track muslims and said mexico is sending immigrants to the u.s. who are rapists and criminals. despite's pundits belief that trump would run out of gas, he
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is leading the crowded republican field, drawing thousands of supporters and his message continues to resonate. >> are you worried he may offend people, talking about muslim i.d. cards, talking about immigrants, rapists? >> he's definitely going to offend some people, but there's nobody that can get up there and tell the truth about issues and not offend somebody. >> fans keep turning out at his rallies. >> we're appealing to people. they've had enough of this nonsense. they want to get down to brass stacks, get the country going again, and the hell with all this politics. >> there have been several lie profile breaches with the secret service and a number of security breaches involving bolt president obama and the white house. away report faults leadership
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failings and budget cuts. >> the latest on the shooting in san bernardino, california. police continue to search for a motive in the attack. we are finding out also more this morning about the shooter.
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>> recapping our top story, police in san bernardino california are trying to find the motive behind wednesday's mat shooting. they identified the two
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suspects, 25-year-old sayed farook and 27-year-old tashfeen malik. we do not know the identities of victims yet. san bernardino police say officers are trying to come to grips with what they have experienced. >> the officers are doing ok. they did their job. that was flat out heroic what they did when they tracked down the suspection and engaged them. >> we've heard so many sides of this argument but they are the same sides that we have been hearing now for song, sand who can, columbine. >> we tried to cover a spectrum of viewpoints, from the right, middle and left and each said it's difficult to kill all the ideologies, intentions to why
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people might want to kill people. addressing the capability is what perhaps needs to be the focus. >> for the first time in my covering of this controversy saying they have to find common ground. >> we are expecting a press conference in about three hours, 12 noon eastern time at 9:00 p.m. local pacific time where we hope to learn more about the victims and about the possibility motives. >> we will be bringing that to you live including any information that we may have on a motive, which is the one thing people have been asking throughout the evening and all morning long, what caused those two gunmen to open fire, a female and male shooter in san bernardino. >> we will continue to bring up the latest throughout the day and next from our newsroom in doha, other stories, including
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russian president vladimir putin's strong words for the u.s. and turkey. >> ankara will regret what it did. the russian president vladimir putin vows to impose more sanctions on turkey over the shooting down of the russian jet. >> hello, welcome, my name is peter doby. i'm in doha. u.k. war planes attack isil targets in syria hitting their ole folds. plus. why would he do that? why would he do something like this? >> shock and disbelief after a mass shooting in california. the couple suspect

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